The Facts You need to Know about Rabies in Monkey bites

The Facts You need to Know about Rabies in Monkey bites

Has anyone here ever visited Bali’s Monkey Forest in Ubud? If you guys are paying attention, there is a sign which warns tourists like this, “Do not stare at or tease the monkeys!”

Indeed, it is a clever advice. It would be even better if it is like, “Do not feed the monkeys! Don’t pat them! Stay well clear!”

But, then the woman who sits nearby selling bananas to tourists to feed the ever-hungry macaques would probably be out of business. As it turns out she does a brisk trade. And so are the local doctors. By now, you probably have read an article in 2016, about the rabies case which done by the monkey bites.

Anthony Wallace, an Aussie traveller, was on a seven-day holiday with his girlfriend Libby McManus, when he was bitten in the head at Ubud’s Monkey Forest. After the bite happened, Mr Wallace went to a first-aid centre at the monkey forest.

A Balinese doctor cleaned the wounds with salty water and antiseptic and administered a tetanus shot. The management said that the monkeys in Ubud’s Monkey forest get tested for rabies once a year by an Australian doctor and the monkeys don’t have rabies, but it was up to Wallace, whether he wanted a rabies shot or not.

He then sought advice from a Central Coast doctor when he returned home. The doctor told him that if he gets rabies you will surely die.

Medical records showed rabies was almost always fatal after neurological symptoms had appeared. However, vaccination could prevent the disease even after exposure. Wallace decided to undergo treatment, which included an immunoglobulin injection into the bite wounds which is in his head.

Additionally, Mr Wallace must have four shots of rabies vaccine over two weeks. He and his girlfriend took precautions when visiting the monkeys, but had not realised the extent of the dangers they posed. They didn’t take a backpack, sunglasses or hats to ensure the monkeys had nothing to grab. They had signs saying ‘don’t stare at or tease the monkeys.

But then a lady was selling bunches of bananas to feed the monkeys, which they agreed to do. One of the big monkeys jumped on his shoulder and he thought it was pretty cool. Then, he gave the banana and the monkey started to eat it. He was sure that he didn’t touch or provoke the monkey.

After that, something dropped on his pants, he looked down and the monkey kind of freaked out. The monkey then dropped the banana, wrapped its arm around his eyes and took a couple of big bites of his head, hard, twice, and then jumped off, and ran away.

Anthony Wallace then brought home his monkey memento-nasty-scalp-wounds. After getting basic first-aid in Bali, Mr Wallace returned to East Gosford in New South Wales to have rabies immunoglobulin injected around the wound and to begin a post-exposure course of four rabies vaccine injections to prevent infection.

fact you need to know; AFTER DOGS, MONKEY BITES MOST COMMON

The story above is far too common.

An Australian study found out that between 2007 and 2011, an average 13 Aussies a month returned home to face the long series of injections. Of the 780 possible rabies exposures in that period, 78.3% occurred in Southeast Asia – mainly Indonesia (47.6%). Of these, almost all (95.2%) occurred in Bali and most involved monkeys (49.4%) or dogs (35.8%).

Besides rabies, there is an added potential for macaques to transmit herpes B virus infection during the attack. It is important to thoroughly cleanse the wound with clean water for more than 5 minutes after a bite and get medical treatment as soon as possible so the risk can be assessed.)

Hundreds of animal bites occur each day in Bali and despite attempts to eradicate rabies on the island, the virus continues to claim victims. They are often young children, who are particularly vulnerable. Even in March 2016, there was a case about a 9-year-old boy from East Bali died 2 weeks after being bitten by his neighbour’s pet dog, according to a media report.

THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT RABIES

Rabies is present in almost every country on earth, but most human cases occur in Southeast Asia. While dogs are responsible for most of the estimated 55,000 deaths each year, virtually any mammal can carry the virus, typically passing it on by biting another animal, or a person.

When you’re overseas, do not ever patting, feeding or even approaching animals even if it is domestic or wild, healthy, sick or injured. We know that It is kind of problematic but the virus is always fatal once its symptoms manifest themselves so you can’t ignore a potential exposure.

For the record, here are a few things you might need to know about rabies…

You don’t have to be bitten to get infected. Though the case is a bit rare, the virus transmission could occur through infected saliva contacting the mucous membranes of your nose or eyes, or through a lick on a scratch or other break in the skin.

Infection is not immediate. After multiplying in the wound, the virus inevitably reaches nerve tissue. Then it travels via the nervous system to the brain, where it continues to multiply with progressively more gruesome and painful clinical symptoms. If rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is administered before the virus enters the nervous system, death can be prevented.

Animals may not appear rabid. The Hollywood image of a dog foaming at the mouth is a far less common sign of rabies than sudden, unexplained paralysis or a change in behaviour. A friendly cat may suddenly be very aggressive, while a normally playful puppy becomes shy and withdrawn. Not eating, eating strange (non-food) objects, pawing the mouth, appearing to choke, difficulty swallowing, chewing the bite wound, seizures, hypersensitivity to touch or sound are among the other sign an animal is infected.

Rabies incubation periods can vary. It usually takes 3-8 weeks for the rabies virus to incubate, but human cases have ranged from just days to years. That’s why it is important to receive PEP as soon as possible and start within 48 hours. If medical care was not sought at the time of the bite it is still possible to get PEP well after the potential exposure, because if the incubation period is at the protracted end, the PEP may still be effective. Only this week I initiated post-exposure treatment for someone bitten by a monkey 4 years ago because she did not realise that treatment was needed at the time.

RABIES IS 100% PREVENTABLE

While it’s 100% deadly, rabies is also 100% preventable. But, a series of steps needs to be taken in the right order to prevent infection.

  1. The wound needs to be cleansed thoroughly with lots of soap and water.
  2. If available, alcohol or iodine should be applied. The wound should be covered with gauze to prevent infection (but not bound), or left uncovered.
    3. It is critical to seek expert medical attention as soon as possible. (Don’t wait for confirmation that the animal was infected. That could take days – even weeks.) It’s important to find a medical facility experienced in rabies treatment that stocks (or can obtain quickly) both Human Rabies Immune Globulin (HRIG) and the first dose of rabies cell culture vaccine. Injected at the site of the wound, HRIG contains rabies antibodies that immediately inactivate and control the rabies virus until the vaccine begins to work.
    4. Have a tetanus booster, if one is required.
    5. Observe the wound for redness and discharge. Bacterial infection may occur after animal bites and antibiotics may be required.

YOU ALSO NEED TO KNOW THE SIGNS OF MONKEY WHICH APPARENTLY INFECTED RABIES

  1. The behaviour of animals infected with the rabies virus will turn out to be more aggressive and difficult to control. This is caused by animal stress, anxiety and fear every time.
  2. Be sensitive to surrounding objects by directly attacking or gnawing.
  3. The animal’s saliva is excessive.
  4. Prefer hiding in dark and cold places because of fear of light, touch water and sound, can be physically seen from weakness, seizures, decreased appetite.
  5. Tails pointing down between 2 feet.

DO NOT DO EVERYTHING WHICH AGAINST THE RULES DURING YOUR VISIT

Here are few tips for you;

1.) Do not bring any bottles or cans into the forest.

2.) Try not to buy bananas. Yes, the monkeys are cute and you think it would be fun to feed them, but they will not settle for only one banana and they can get aggressive till they get them all.

3.) Do not have any food or candy in your pockets, handbag or backpack. The monkeys have an extremely well-developed sense of smell, and they will smell everything from a tiny bit of chocolate to a package of chewing gum. You can`t hide any food or candy from the monkeys, they will find it.

4.) Do not encourage the monkeys to climb up on you. They can bite and scratch, which in worst case can give infections and rabies or other diseases.

5.) Walk around the forest calm and peaceful, and do not approach the monkeys or get too close.

6.) If a monkey tries to climb onto you, don`t panic and scream and run. Try to find or call the officer in the place.

Monkey Forest or any other place with their wild monkey is a cool place, just as long as you are educated and prepared, and know the risk of being bitten if you get too close to the monkeys. Be careful about giving them food and don’t encourage them to climb on you. They look so small, cute and innocent, but they can be very aggressive.

Bali is a beautiful country, with exceptionally beautiful people and culture, but please seek medical attention if you get any kind of scratch or bite from an animal in this country. Just be aware of your surroundings and don`t go too close to the monkeys, and you will have a great time.

The 16th Ubud Writers & Readers Festival (UWRF) Theme: Karma

The 16th Ubud Writers & Readers Festival (UWRF) Theme: Karma

The 16th Ubud Writers & Readers Festival (UWRF) was successfully held on October 23-27 2019, in Ubud, Gianyar.

Starting from writers, artists, activists, directors, intellectuals from all over the world will compete in Ubud to share stories and understand who discuss this year’s theme, ‘Karma’.

From humble beginnings in 2004, the Ubud Writers & Readers Festival has evolved into one of the world’s most celebrated literary and artistic events – an annual pilgrimage for lovers of literature and conversation.

This year’s Festival, named one of the five best literary events for 2019 by The Telegraph UK, will explore the impacts of our personal and collective actions on our social and physical environments.

Bringing together some of the world’s most powerful voices in a melting pot of artists, authors, thinkers and performers, the Festival is a platform for meaningful exchange and cross-cultural dialogue. A place where artists and audiences alike can discuss shared inspirations, ideas and concerns, the Festival transcends cultural and geographical borders

Across five days, Ubud Writers & Readers Festival delivers an extensive range of events – from fiery conversations to intimate literary lunches, gripping live performances and hands-on workshops. With 180+ speakers appearing in 150+ events across 20+ venues, the Festival transforms the artistic village of Ubud into a thriving creative hub for five days each year.

Ubud Writers Festival 2019 lineup: writers, artists and activists

Glimpsing at the first round of announced storytellers, this year once again promises to be a culturally and artistically diverse line-up with names including Chinese-American award-winning author Jenny Zhang; bestselling author Parag Khanna; Zimbabwean-American debut writer Novuyo Rosa Tshuma who addresses colonisation and decolonisation topics; one of Britain’s most popular food writers Yotam Ottolenghi, together with award-winning novelist Laksmi Pamuntjak from Indonesia who writes about food on the path to self-discovery; Human Rights Watch’s Andreas Harsono will put the archipelago’s minorities and marginalised communities in the spotlight while visual artist and writer Lala Bohang experiments with invisible, forbidden and imaginary matters of Indonesian society; Susan Orlean who is the author of the bestsellers The Library Book and The Orchid Thief; and many others.

Like many of the Festival’s previous themes, this year’s is drawn from a Hindu philosophy, but this time it’s one that is known universally.

For Balinese Hindus, Karma Phala is the spiritual principle that each action has a consequence equal in force, and similar in form. “Karma Phala nak cicih” describes the belief, and cicih means certain and swift. Karmaphala gives optimism to every human being, even all who find life. In this teaching, all actions will bring results. Whatever we do, like the results we will receive.

The one who receives is what brings, and the effect to others. Karma Phala is a law that causes every action to bring about results. In the Hindu concept, acting consists of: doing through the mind, doing through the words, and doing through behavior, the three of them who will bring the results for those who do. If the action is good, definitely certain, and vice versa.

The conversations between literary luminaries, emerging writers, and leading journalists will ask whether we truly understand the consequences of our actions, and how we can best respond to the actions of others. They will delve into the heart of every gripping story: decision and consequence.

For its 16th year, the Festival worked with community visual artist Samuel Indratma, to create an artwork reflecting the theme

The festival which will be held for five days in a row will explore the interaction of the human person and the collective in the social environment. Interesting discussions brought by literary figures, scholars, to emerging writers will enliven the Festival. Festival visitors can learn to really consider the completion of their actions, and how they can best respond to the actions of others.

From weighty literary discussions and senior performances that should not be missed, Festival visitors will discuss the definite things of this year’s Festival, namely decisions and changes.

Along with the release of the 2019 theme, UWRF also launched its 16th year artwork, which was created by the community visual artist Samuel Indratma, one of the founders of the well-known public in Yogyakarta, Apotik Komik.

Regarding the process of making this Karma-themed artwork, Samuel Indratma said, “In addition to translating the spirit of the Ubud Writers & Readers Festival, I also try to translate what karma itself looks like. Do humans change their faces? Are humans changing their shape? This is why I chose the mask symbol. I imagine karma as a human cycle that continues to spin, then back again. ”

“Last year’s theme, Jagadhita: The World We Create, is a reminder that harmony with others must be one of the main goals of life,” continued Janet DeNeefe. “When the consequences of climate change cannot be ignored, and world leaders continue to avoid that responsibility, we will wonder what kind of karma will occur in 2019, and consider things that might happen when we cannot find out. the solution to deal with it. ”

“In this 16th year, UWRF will celebrate the theme of Karma with writers, artists and activists from all over Indonesia and the world who are well aware of the consequences of their actions. Through a cross-cultural perspective on the Hindu Karma principle, we will explore how each of us makes decisions today that can shape our future together, “concluded Janet DeNeefe.

When the consequences of climate change cannot be ignored, and world leaders continue to avoid these responsibilities, we will wonder what kind of karma will occur in 2019, and consider things that might happen when we cannot find a solution to deal with it.

Which Dog or Animals Can be infected by Rabies?

Which Dog or Animals Can be infected by Rabies?

Rabies or commonly called “mad dog” is a disease that has existed in Indonesia for decades.

But, there are still many ‘misconceptions’ or misperceptions that develop in the community. This misperception makes a lot of people injured, ranging from being bitten by a vicious dog to death. What are the misperceptions that are circulating?

Characteristics of Animals Affected by Rabies

Rabies can attack all mammals. Characteristics of animals infected with rabies can be identified by several factors, such as:

  1. The behavior of animals infected with the rabies virus will turn out to be more aggressive and difficult to control. This is caused by animal stress, anxiety and fear every time,
  2. Be sensitive to surrounding objects by directly attacking or gnawing,
  3. The animal’s saliva is excessive,
  4. Prefer hiding in dark and cold places because of fear of light, touch water and sound,
  5. Can be physically seen from weakness, seizures, decreased appetite,
  6. And tails pointing down between 2 feet.
  7. Not only dogs, there are many other animals that can transmit rabies to humans

Of the many cases of animal bites containing rabies, 95% of rabies animal bite cases in humans are indeed caused by dogs. But, there are still other animals that can transmit rabies and if you don’t know, the risk is quite dangerous.

All mammals can be infected with the rabies virus, and as such, they can also transmit the disease to humans. Mammals are all warm-blooded animals that have mammary glands for breastfeeding; animals that we generally encounter are: Dogs, Cats, Bats, Monkeys / Monkeys, Cows, Horses.

Note: Animals in italics are the main animals that can transmit rabies to humans because they have a habit of biting. Other mammals can be infected but very rarely transmit to humans.

Animals other than mammals such as snakes, crocodiles, birds, fish and frogs cannot be infected and transmit rabies.

  1. Why can animals that bite transmit rabies? Do animals infected with rabies only transmit by bite?

Rabies is a virus that is not always present in all mammals. These animals can only have a virus if they get the virus from the bite of an animal infected with rabies. So don’t assume that all the dogs around you can transmit rabies.

But never too little dog bites; what to do if you are bitten by a dog will be discussed in the next point. For further discussion, I will use the term “rabies animals” to animals that have the rabies virus in their bodies.

The rabies virus is in the saliva of rabies animals. When rabies animals bite humans, the virus in the animal’s saliva moves to the open human wound caused by the bite. Simply put, this virus can only enter our body if there are open sores, or through the surface of the body that is not covered by the skin (such as the eyes). So animals such as cows and horses can be infected with rabies (for example, they are bitten by dogs infected with rabies) but they rarely bite people or suddenly become bitten when they are infected with rabies.

For hunters of wild animals or those of you who like to venture into caves or into the forest must also be vigilant with bites of bats, monkeys, and monkeys because they are also animals that can transmit rabies.

Licking animals in open wounds can also make us infected with rabies. Not only that, there are several incidents of humans infected with rabies through scratching rabies animals. Loh? Do you also have saliva in your paws? Yes, some animals often clean their claws by licking their palms and claws. So the virus from saliva can also dwell in the animal’s claws and scratch marks make the virus enter our bodies.

  1. Will killing all stray dogs around our settlement reduce the risk of rabies?

Too bad the answer is no. Killing all stray dogs only has the effect of reducing the number of stray dogs in our environment – temporarily. As long as around our area there are still food scraps that are open, these animals will continue to arrive in our area. Don’t forget, dogs have a pretty sharp sense of smell.

We should make sure that landfills in our environment are tightly closed to reduce the number of stray dogs circulating around our area. The rabies virus is a virus that is transmitted quickly. Simply put, this virus spreads to animals around us like a multilevel marketing business.

One dog can transmit it to other dogs, before eventually he himself will die because this virus causes brain damage. For example, one rabies dog can bite two healthy dogs – in fact, it can be more than this; You can imagine what will happen in a period of several months if no preventive action is taken.

  1. How can my pet not transmit rabies to me? Is confining them at home enough?

Lick or – if they accidentally – scratch and bite your pet 99% safe if: you make sure all your pets (dogs, cats, and monkeys) have been vaccinated against rabies once a year. The Indonesian government in all regions always provides a free rabies vaccine every YEAR.

Why does it have to be once a year? Because rabies immunity in pets lasts only for a year. More than a year, these animals will have the risk of contracting rabies again if not vaccinated. Where is this free rabies vaccine obtained? Good news!! Visit the local office that deals with animal husbandry and animal health, there are a lot of veterinarians ready to help you.

  1. If it’s just an animal bite, I’m not afraid. What is the biggest danger of rabies?

Dead! There are many people who underestimate animal bites and only treat like normal wounds. As long as the animal that bites is not infected with rabies, you are actually relatively safe from the danger of rabies.

What is dangerous is, when symptoms of rabies appear in humans, the disease is 100% will cause death. In other words, when the symptoms appear the doctor cannot provide any treatment that can cure the patient. Once infected, this virus will multiply in our body and they will damage our brain until finally it is death. Every 10 minutes, there is 1 person in the world who dies from rabies. Most rabies victims are children (4 out of 10 rabies deaths occur in children under 15 years).

A few tips for parents, do not ever scold children excessively when they are injured while playing. This can make them afraid to report that at any time they are bitten by a dog while playing. I belong to this category; several times I – when I was a child – injured when playing and never reported my parents for fear of being scolded.

  1. What should I do if I am bitten by an animal suspected of being rabies?

It is quite difficult to ensure that the animal that bites (licks / scratches) us has rabies, especially if it is not our pet. You should do these two things if you are bitten by an animal: Wash the wound with running water and soap for 15 minutes.

Give povidon iodine if you have supplies. This method is effective enough to reduce the amount of virus that enters your body. Immediately seek treatment at the nearest health center or hospital. The sooner you seek treatment the better because this virus will continue to multiply in your body if you are not treated by a doctor.

Explain to the treating doctor that you have been bitten by an animal. There you will be given an Anti-Rabies Vaccine. The vaccine series is quite long; You have to go back and forth for treatment for 3x. It is very important that you get all vaccines on schedule.

  1. Can traditional medicine help?

Unfortunately, so far there have been no herbal medicines or traditional medicines reported to be able to prevent rabies. Indeed in several countries including Indonesia there are still many who try to treat animal bites with traditional medicine.

Besides being ineffective, there are a lot of traditional treatments that actually cause infection. So, back to point 6, immediately seek treatment to the nearest doctor.

 

  1. What should I do with animals that bite me?

Immediately report to the local veterinarian or the nearest office about dog bite cases. If the dog is wild, suggest to residents around to stay away from the dog.

Never kill a dog that bites you, because the dog may not necessarily bite because they are infected with rabies.

Dogs infected with rabies will die within approximately 14 days. Immediately send the dead dog’s body to the nearest animal health office so that the rabies virus can be checked.

THE TRI DATU PHILOSOPHY ON BALINESE; THE BALANCE IN LIFE

THE TRI DATU PHILOSOPHY ON BALINESE; THE BALANCE IN LIFE

“Balance is the key to everything. What we do, think, say, eat, feel, they all require awareness which we can grow through it…”

A quote from Koi Fresco, and also teacher within Buddhism, Hinduism & other eastern philosophies and soul practices. Aside from making a YouTube channel, only 24 years of age, Koi is already the published author of his first book, A (Not So) Enlightened Youth which has sold thousands of copies worldwide. But anyway, we’re not here talking about who he is, but how this good philosophy creates the balance in life.

Apart from the beauty of the nature, and frenetic amazing clubs, Bali has been existed as a popular destination for travellers because of their conservative culture and people. Majority of Balinese people is following the Bali-Hinduism, a kind of way to worship the God, which they called it Sang Hyang Widhi, the creators of everything.

Technically, there are perhaps a lot kinds of Hindu religion in the world, in which they have some similarity but also has some differences. For example, the Hindus in India and Bali, they are the same in substances, but they have differences in some of ways in worshiping.

The one thing that you will notice, the Balinese Hindu find their way to worship the God by many rituals. There are maybe hundreds of kinds of ceremony in Bali, depending on the region, so each place in Bali have their own ‘style’, but in essence, it is the same. The Balinese people believe that they must conserve the culture which bequeathed from the ancestry.

No wonder, sometimes you could see a ceremony going on in some local house, temples, or even in the middle of the streets. Balinese people believe that in order to keep Bali stay the same, they need to always balancing their life and their spirituality.

These teaching of balance in life has attached to the life of Balinese people seen in their daily basis; doing a prayer and put some daily-offerings or they called it “canang”, which made from coconut leaf, consist of some plants and flowers.

The flowers have three variants which represents, Tri Murti, the big three manifestations of God. The Hindu believes the Tri Murti as the main aspects in life. It also represents the life circle; birth, life, and death. These symbols also found in their unique yarn bracelet, which Balinese people always wear, the Tri Datu.

Etymologically, Tri means three and Datu means the power, and it also symbolize the Tri Murti, the great triad of Hindu gods comprising Brahma, Vishnu, and Shiva, who are responsible for the creation, upkeep and destruction of the world, symbolized by each colour in the yarn.

Brahma, the God of creation represented by red color, has a line of duty in the creation of the world and all creatures. The word Brahma in Sanskrit word has meaning; the one which grows, develops, evolves, and overflows.

In some sources, the name Lord Brahma is associated with fire or Agni (in Sanskrit word). Balinese people said that Brahma is believed to be the God of fire or kitchen… What’s this got to do with kitchen anyway? They believed that the fire which we always use to cook in the kitchen represents Lord Brahma’s power. With fire we could create food, from what is not exist yet into an existence. These creation process then called Lord Brahma’s power as a creator. That is why all the Balinese houses always put “canang” as a symbol of gratitude in the kitchen.

Lord Brahma is described as white bearded old man who has four hands with four faces. Each Brahma’s faces are facing towards the four points of compass. As the four hands of Brahma holding the tools, which consist of a prayer beads, symbolizing the life circle with no end, the spoon, which symbolize the religion ceremony, the jug as a symbol of eternity, and a book which symbolizes the science.

He also associated with Sarasvati, the Goddess of knowledge, which symbolizes our growth as a human being who learn everything in the world, and by this knowledge we could create something useful for our life.

Vishnu, represented by the black colour, is the preserver and protector of the universe. Vishnu’s worshippers, usually called Vaishnava or Wisnawa, consider him as the greatest God which has the role to descend to the earth in the most troubled times to restore the balance of good and evil.

He is also called as the God of water. Water is the most important thing in lives, which without it we cannot survive. Water act as a preserver to survive. Like the example of when we plant trees, the tree will not die, if we always maintain it by giving the water every day. Lord Vishnu describe as a man with a bluish-black skin, has the power of Sri, the Goddess of prosperity, armed with Chakras, and ride a big bird which is called Garuda Vishnu. Yes… the one of the biggest statue in the world which you see in Bali is the statue of Vishnu or Garuda Vishnu.

Lord Shiva represented by white colour, has the role to destroy or “reset” the universe to re-create it again. It might be confusing for some people, because for those who doesn’t understand the meaning would be scared of this destroying concept. Lord Shiva has the power to bring everything back to its origin. All living things who are born, grow, and develop eventually will die and return to nothing.

Lord Shiva is described as a three-eyed man, using a tiger leather belt, a neck ornament in the form of a cobra, and ride a cow called Nandini, which is why some Hindu’s people don’t eat cow’s meat. Lord Shiva has the power of Durga the unbeatable and greatest Goddess, armed with a trident. Lord Shiva also has 4 hands, each of which holds “tri wahyudi”, a pitcher, pine, and prayer beads.

Lord Shiva’s power of destruction and re-creation are used even now as a kind of way to destroy the illusions, a bad or negative aura and imperfections in the human mind and body, which could be manifested in many things, paving the way for beneficial change. Another unique philosophical view point where the destruction is not arbitrary, but constructive. Shiva is therefore seen as the source of both good and evil.

All concept of Tri Murti is represented on Tri Datu’s yarn bracelet. Essentially, the Tri Datu is a self-actualization of human beings which is to create, preserve, and restoring the origin of nature through its contents. Nevertheless, there are also another philosophy inside it, like the circle of life (born, grow, and death) and also the concept of important parts of human (mind, body, and soul). Altogether, it creates an identity to Hinduism as reminder to always keep the balance in life, all at once. However, this yarn bracelet must be woven in the form of binding to one another. In addition, the shape of the bond on this bracelet is not like the ribbon which we used to tie the hair.

Although used as a form of worship tools by Hindus, the tri datu yarn bracelet is not exclusively for Hindus. Other people from other religions and believes are also permitted to wear this bracelet. Remembering that throughout the century, the teachings of Hinduism are considered universal.

But it must be used properly and wisely. Do not wear it on your feet otherwise it would be a form of humiliation on a religious symbol for the Hindus. So, it is no problem for a non-Hindu to wear it, since it is used on the right place, like as a necklace or a bracelet. If it is used without a clear purpose, for instance on the foot, it can be considered as a humiliation.

This yarn bracelet is considered as a something which can bring a positive vibe to the people, especially the one who wear it, instead of a charm which has a magic or spell in it. Regardless of the reason, perhaps the purpose is the same, it is to remind us that we live in this world is to live the process of life which will surely die, and we should always think and do good in life.

Tri Datu concept could be used as a to self-introspection. So that it can improve the quality of yourself for the better. Even though it’s not easy, it is better to stand than sit, it is better to walk than stand, it is better to run than walk.

Healthy mind, good words, and good deeds are perhaps a something that we all need as a human being. Balance, might be something that you will not find, but a something that you create and believe. Therefore, by using the Tri Datu yarn, we will be more wise, careful, and introspective to ourselves about this life-journey in the world we’re livin’.

Ubud Writers & Readers Festival is an Important Event to be Attend in Bali

Ubud Writers & Readers Festival is an Important Event to be Attend in Bali

Ubud Writers and Readers Festival (UWRF) is an annual literary event festival held at Ubud, Bali in Indonesia.

It is organized by the not-for-profit foundation Yayasan Mudra Swari Saraswati. The festival was first conceived of by Janet DeNeefe, Co-founder of the Foundation, as a healing project in response to the first 2002 Bali bombings.

It was first held in 2003 as part of an effort to help revive tourism, the island’s main economic lifeline, after terrorist bombings devastated the island’s Kuta district a year earlier. The festival is usually in October each year.

The literature festival is considered as one of the best five in the world. It is known as Southeast Asia’s biggest festival of words and ideas, which is participated by the world’s most celebrated writers, artists, thinkers and performers.

Ubud Writer Festival is beginning with 12th edition of UWRF was held in 2015 in 38 venues across Bali, which was participated by more than 200 writers fromm all over the world. A controversy was raised over the proposed discussion about Indonesia’s anti-communist purges that killed an estimated 500,000 people in 1965.

It continues with13th edition of UWRF was held in 2016, which was participated by 160 of the world’s leading authors, artists and performers. For 2017 UWRF was the 14th edition of the festival, which was held from October 25-29, participated by more than 150 authors, artists and activists from 31 countries.  The last one was15th edition of UWRF was held from 24 October to 28 October, 2018 which was focused on gender equality and diversity.

If you are still confused on what to expect during Ubud Writer Festival, we will try to explaining more details to you. Attracting over 150 writers, artists and performers from all over the globe, the theme of this year’s edition is “Karma”, based on the Hindu philosophy where each action prompts an equally forceful consequence which is similar in form. Leading journalists, literary luminaries and emerging writers will engage in conversations to discuss the question of whether we’re fully aware of our actions and their consequences, and what is the best way to respond to the actions of others.

The festival’s organiser, Janet DeNeefe, links this year’s theme of Karma directly with the world’s most urgent issues of global warming and ecological meltdown. While global leaders in positions of power continue to drag their feet on taking meaningful action, the festival’s participants will discuss the meaning of Karma in today’s world, and consider its consequences when we don’t take up our responsibilities.

For the artist and writers, glimpsing at the first round of announced storytellers, this year once again promises to be a culturally and artistically diverse line-up with names including Chinese-American award-winning author Jenny Zhang; bestselling author Parag Khanna; Zimbabwean-American debut writer Novuyo Rosa Tshuma who addresses colonisation and decolonisation topics; one of Britain’s most popular food writers Yotam Ottolenghi, together with award-winning novelist Laksmi Pamuntjak from Indonesia who writes about food on the path to self-discovery; Human Rights Watch’s Andreas Harsono will put the archipelago’s minorities and marginalised communities in the spotlight while visual artist and writer Lala Bohang experiments with invisible, forbidden and imaginary matters of Indonesian society; Susan Orlean who is the author of the bestsellers The Library Book and The Orchid Thief; and many others.

Like many of the Festival’s previous themes, this year’s is drawn from a Hindu philosophy, but this time it’s one that is known universally. For many in the West, karma is a simplification of justice served. For Balinese Hindus, Karma Phala is the spiritual principle that each action has a consequence equal in force, and similar in form. “Karma Phala nak cicih” describes the belief; cicih means certain and swift. “As actions in their previous life affect their present, and deeds committed in the present affect their future, Balinese Hindus are aware their fate is not divine in origin, but in their own hands,” commented UWRF Founder & Director Janet DeNeefe.

This year’s Festival, named one of the five best literary events for 2019 by The Telegraph UK, will explore the impacts of our personal and collective actions on our social and physical environments. The compelling conversations between literary luminaries, emerging writers, and leading journalists will ask whether we truly understand the consequences of our actions, and how we can best respond to the actions of others.

The fiery discussions, powerful performances, literary lunches, and after dark events will delve into the heart of every gripping story: decision and consequence. Along with the 2019 theme, the UWRF also unveiled the artwork for its 16th year, created by community visual artist Samuel Indratma, one of the Founders of the prominent Yogyakarta public art collective, Apotik Komik.

On the process of responding to the theme Indratma commented, “As well as translating the spirit of the Ubud Writers & Readers Festival, I also tried to translate what Karma is like. Do people change their face? Do they change their form? This is why I chose the symbol of the mask. I imagined Karma as a human cycle that continues to spin, then returns again.”

“Last year’s theme, Jagadhita: The World We Create, was an important reminder that harmony with others should be one of life’s primary goals,” DeNeefe continued. “At a time when the consequences of climate change are impossible to ignore, and world leaders continue to evade responsibility, we’ll ask what Karma looks like in 2019, and consider the tensions that emerge when we don’t look it squarely in the face. “In our 16th year, we’ll celebrate the writers, artists, and activists from across Indonesia and the world who are deeply aware of the consequences of their actions. Through cross-cultural perspectives on the Hindu principle of Karma, we’ll explore how each of us make decisions today that shape our shared future.”

It’s always exciting to see people with the same passion as you from around the world right? Through this event, you can meet writers from around the world. This event is really being an important event for writers to come and enjoy the vibe of ubud meanwhile sharing their thoughts during Ubud Writer Festival. Take an example In its first year the festival featured readings, workshops, discussions, and other events with 67 writers across 27 venues. The past decade has brought major changes, and challenges, to not only the festival but also its home city, where seemingly untempered expansion has created a “point of no return” fear that is a main topic of conversation. In 2003, Elizabeth Gilbert’s Eat, Pray, Love had yet to make the western world fall in love with—and decide to visit—Ubud. As one Indonesian reporter put it this year, Ubud today is so “congested, crowded and choked with traffic [that] walking is faster than taking a taxi.” During the festival this was certainly true.

As the year goes by, there will be more opportunity the participants will get bigger than before. Especially now, the information is being spread widely about Ubud Writer Festival. You have to visit this event if you are having passion in writing. There will be a lot of opportunities waiting for you to explore your passion and not limited to develop your skill in writing. In Indonesia itself, Ubud Writer Festival is really famous. It proves by so many Indonesian biggest name in this area like Pramoedya Ananta Tour was reported attending this event and share her experience in writing journey.

For its 16th year as Southeast Asia’s leading literary event, Ubud Writers & Readers Festival has announced its full program and lineup of over 180 authors, journalists, artists and activists from 30 countries. From 23–27 October, they’ll appear in more than 170 events across 70+ venues in Ubud, which this year placed sixth on Travel + Leisure’s Top 15 Cities in the World. From Indonesia to Italy, Colombia to Cameroon, Thailand to Turkey, Portugal to Pakistan and dozens of countries in between, the five-day program of in-conversations, panel discussions, literary lunches, music and arts performances, writing workshops, art exhibitions, book launches and more will demonstrate why The Telegraph named UWRF one of the world’s five best literary festivals for 2019. It sounds really interesting right?

UNICARE CLINIC, one of the advanced clinic in Bali for this year also participating on sponsoring this event.

UNICARE CLINIC is ready to provide health care service during your trip for Ubud Writer Festival. We cover so many treatments including IV treatment, vaccinated treatment, or even you need something to keep you to look good, they will provide you with their aesthetic treatment.

You will get a complete package during Ubud Writer Festival this year, from fulfilling your desire for your passion meanwhile keeping your body in completely healthy condition. So, what are you waiting for? Booked your ticket and see you on Ubud Writer Festival this year.

Don’t forget to tell your friends about this event so we can share the experience together.